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Firefighters save woman from burning home

A local woman is hailing Clayton County firefighters after they saved her from her burning home.

Flames and thick smoke quickly spread through the house, trapping Nicole Ramey in her bathroom.

In his 34 years as a firefighter in East Point, Ramey’s husband William has never seen the devastation of a house fire from this perspective.

“Like everybody else, you're always thinking, 'It will never happen to me,'” William Ramey said.

But his home on Blackfoot Trail in Clayton County was ravaged by a fire Friday that also nearly claimed his wife, Nicole.

She works as a paramedic and firefighters say her quick thinking saved her life after she awoke to the smell of smoke.

TRENDING STORIES:

WANTED: Convicted murderer leaves courthouse before verdict is read Driver shoots at another car in road rage incident along I-20 Popular wing restaurant fails health inspection … partly because of cockroaches "She said the door didn't feel hot, so she opened the door and she was hit in the face with a wall of smoke and heat and she closed it back and grabbed the pups, put them in the bathtub and covered them up with towels and herself," William Ramey told Channel 2’s Carl Willis . She was unable to escape, but called 911 and shut two doors between herself and the fire, buying herself just enough time. "When our firefighters were inside trying to locate her, they did actually hear her screaming for help and then once they made it to her, she was no longer responsive. They rescued her through that front window,” Clayton County Fire and Rescue Battalion Chief Laura Richardson said. They rescued the dogs, too, giving them oxygen on scene. Richardson told Willis the firefighters knew exactly what they needed to do to overcome this challenging rescue. "They were aggressive. They didn't hesitate with anything,” Richardson told Willis. There's not much of the home that wasn't impacted by the fire and the effort to put it out, but Nicole made it out. "Luckily, she wasn't burned but (suffered) a lot smoke inhalation,” sister-in-law Renee Blizzard said. "I'm glad she's still here with me,” William Ramey told Willis. Firefighters are still working to determine the cause of the fire.

Firefighters save woman from burning home

A local woman is hailing Clayton County firefighters after they saved her from her burning home.

Flames and thick smoke quickly spread through the house, trapping Nicole Ramey in her bathroom.

In his 34 years as a firefighter in East Point, Ramey’s husband William has never seen the devastation of a house fire from this perspective.

“Like everybody else, you're always thinking, 'It will never happen to me,'” William Ramey said.

But his home on Blackfoot Trail in Clayton County was ravaged by a fire Friday that also nearly claimed his wife, Nicole.

She works as a paramedic and firefighters say her quick thinking saved her life after she awoke to the smell of smoke.

TRENDING STORIES:

WANTED: Convicted murderer leaves courthouse before verdict is read Driver shoots at another car in road rage incident along I-20 Popular wing restaurant fails health inspection … partly because of cockroaches "She said the door didn't feel hot, so she opened the door and she was hit in the face with a wall of smoke and heat and she closed it back and grabbed the pups, put them in the bathtub and covered them up with towels and herself," William Ramey told Channel 2’s Carl Willis . She was unable to escape, but called 911 and shut two doors between herself and the fire, buying herself just enough time. "When our firefighters were inside trying to locate her, they did actually hear her screaming for help and then once they made it to her, she was no longer responsive. They rescued her through that front window,” Clayton County Fire and Rescue Battalion Chief Laura Richardson said. They rescued the dogs, too, giving them oxygen on scene. Richardson told Willis the firefighters knew exactly what they needed to do to overcome this challenging rescue. "They were aggressive. They didn't hesitate with anything,” Richardson told Willis. There's not much of the home that wasn't impacted by the fire and the effort to put it out, but Nicole made it out. "Luckily, she wasn't burned but (suffered) a lot smoke inhalation,” sister-in-law Renee Blizzard said. "I'm glad she's still here with me,” William Ramey told Willis. Firefighters are still working to determine the cause of the fire.

Driver shoots at another car in road rage incident along I-20

DeKalb County police say a shooting incident along Interstate 20 on Friday was the result of road rage. 

The incident happened in the westbound lane of I-20 near Columbia Drive just after 6 p.m. 

Investigators said shooter and the victim were merging on I-20 when the victim’s car passed the shooter on the entry ramp.

The shooter then became mad and shot at the victim’s car, shooting out the victim’s window and hitting the driver with shattered glass.

The driver, a female, was taken to a nearby hospital to be checked out. Her passenger was not injured. 

The suspected shooter is still on the loose.   

Two lanes were closed to traffic, according to the Triple Team Traffic.

TRAVEL ADVISORY: Police Activity: I-20./wb past I-285; (exit 67); two right lanes are blocked; delays; https://t.co/kTgeaYu0Zi; #ATLtraffic pic.twitter.com/Mz3oyStQmc — Triple Team Traffic (@WSBTraffic) April 20, 2018

Officials originally said the victim was in moderate to serious condition from the shooting. 

Stay with WSBTV.com for the latest on this developing story. 

Driver shoots at another car in road rage incident along I-20

DeKalb County police say a shooting incident along Interstate 20 on Friday was the result of road rage. 

The incident happened in the westbound lane of I-20 near Columbia Drive just after 6 p.m. 

Investigators said shooter and the victim were merging on I-20 when the victim’s car passed the shooter on the entry ramp.

The shooter then became mad and shot at the victim’s car, shooting out the victim’s window and hitting the driver with shattered glass.

The driver, a female, was taken to a nearby hospital to be checked out. Her passenger was not injured. 

The suspected shooter is still on the loose.   

Two lanes were closed to traffic, according to the Triple Team Traffic.

TRAVEL ADVISORY: Police Activity: I-20./wb past I-285; (exit 67); two right lanes are blocked; delays; https://t.co/kTgeaYu0Zi; #ATLtraffic pic.twitter.com/Mz3oyStQmc — Triple Team Traffic (@WSBTraffic) April 20, 2018

Officials originally said the victim was in moderate to serious condition from the shooting. 

Stay with WSBTV.com for the latest on this developing story. 

Top agent who led serial bombing investigation talks about execution of bomber

The FBI agent who led a serial bombing investigation in metro Atlanta is now walking us through the day they found an explosive at the federal courthouse downtown.

Walter Leroy Moody, 83, sent bombs to a federal judge and a civil rights attorney, killing both men.

Channel 2 investigative reporter Mark Winne was at the Russell Federal Building the day police removed another one of Moody’s bombs in 1989. 

Bill Hinshaw said he had just become the FBI agent in charge in Atlanta when a mail bomb was intercepted at the 11th Circuit courthouse.

Moody was ultimately convicted of sending that bomb as well as a bomb that killed 11th Circuit Judge Robert Vance at his Alabama home. Vance was at his kitchen table when he opened a package after a morning of errands and yard work.

The explosion ripped through the home near Birmingham, killing Vance instantly and severely injuring his wife, Helen. 

Another of Moody’s bombs killed civil rights attorney Robbie Robinson in Savannah. Still another bomb was intercepted at a Florida NAACP office.

“He thought he was smarter than everybody else,” Hinshaw told Winne. 

Ed Tolley represented Moody in two federal cases. Tolley did not handle the case in Alabama for Vance's murder, which led to Moody’s execution in Alabama on Thursday night. 

Tolley told Winne that he believes Robinson's murder was part of an elaborate smokescreen and Moody never reached his ultimate target.

“I could be mistaken, but I’ve always believed that his ultimate goal was to get revenge against a federal judge that had sentenced him when he was in his early 20s,” Tolley said.  

Bruce Harvey represented Moody during most of the federal investigation but not in his trial. He told Winne that he stayed in touch with Moody throughout the years.

“I heard from him last week. He wanted me to get involved in his last-ditch efforts to save his life, but I was otherwise engaged,” Harvey said. 

Tolley said the bombings changed security procedures at court houses. 

“He changed the way we get into court houses. He changed the way marshals protect judges. He changed the way we think about the death penalty,” Tolley told Winne. 

Moody was pronounced dead at 8:42 p.m. following an injection at the Alabama prison at Atmore. He had no last statement and did not respond when an official asked if he had any last words shortly before the chemicals began flowing.

Moody was convicted in 1991 in federal court of bomb-related charges and sentenced to seven life terms plus 400 years. Moody had always maintained his innocence.

Moody became the oldest U.S. inmate put to death since executions resumed in the U.S. in the 1970s, according to the non-profit Death Penalty Information Center. His attorneys argued in court filings and a clemency petition to Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey that his age and vein condition would make lethal injection more difficult.

The U.S. Supreme Court temporarily stayed execution plans Thursday evening to consider Moody's late appeals, but later lifted the stay without comment, allowing the execution to go forward.

Alabama Attorney General Steve Marshall said Thursday night that after nearly 30 years, "Tonight, Mr. Moody's appeals finally came to a rightful end. Justice has been served."

The Associated Press contributed to this article.

Top agent who led serial bombing investigation talks about execution of bomber

The FBI agent who led a serial bombing investigation in metro Atlanta is now walking us through the day they found an explosive at the federal courthouse downtown.

Walter Leroy Moody, 83, sent bombs to a federal judge and a civil rights attorney, killing both men.

Channel 2 investigative reporter Mark Winne was at the Russell Federal Building the day police removed another one of Moody’s bombs in 1989. 

Bill Hinshaw said he had just become the FBI agent in charge in Atlanta when a mail bomb was intercepted at the 11th Circuit courthouse.

Moody was ultimately convicted of sending that bomb as well as a bomb that killed 11th Circuit Judge Robert Vance at his Alabama home. Vance was at his kitchen table when he opened a package after a morning of errands and yard work.

The explosion ripped through the home near Birmingham, killing Vance instantly and severely injuring his wife, Helen. 

Another of Moody’s bombs killed civil rights attorney Robbie Robinson in Savannah. Still another bomb was intercepted at a Florida NAACP office.

“He thought he was smarter than everybody else,” Hinshaw told Winne. 

Ed Tolley represented Moody in two federal cases. Tolley did not handle the case in Alabama for Vance's murder, which led to Moody’s execution in Alabama on Thursday night. 

Tolley told Winne that he believes Robinson's murder was part of an elaborate smokescreen and Moody never reached his ultimate target.

“I could be mistaken, but I’ve always believed that his ultimate goal was to get revenge against a federal judge that had sentenced him when he was in his early 20s,” Tolley said.  

Bruce Harvey represented Moody during most of the federal investigation but not in his trial. He told Winne that he stayed in touch with Moody throughout the years.

“I heard from him last week. He wanted me to get involved in his last-ditch efforts to save his life, but I was otherwise engaged,” Harvey said. 

Tolley said the bombings changed security procedures at court houses. 

“He changed the way we get into court houses. He changed the way marshals protect judges. He changed the way we think about the death penalty,” Tolley told Winne. 

Moody was pronounced dead at 8:42 p.m. following an injection at the Alabama prison at Atmore. He had no last statement and did not respond when an official asked if he had any last words shortly before the chemicals began flowing.

Moody was convicted in 1991 in federal court of bomb-related charges and sentenced to seven life terms plus 400 years. Moody had always maintained his innocence.

Moody became the oldest U.S. inmate put to death since executions resumed in the U.S. in the 1970s, according to the non-profit Death Penalty Information Center. His attorneys argued in court filings and a clemency petition to Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey that his age and vein condition would make lethal injection more difficult.

The U.S. Supreme Court temporarily stayed execution plans Thursday evening to consider Moody's late appeals, but later lifted the stay without comment, allowing the execution to go forward.

Alabama Attorney General Steve Marshall said Thursday night that after nearly 30 years, "Tonight, Mr. Moody's appeals finally came to a rightful end. Justice has been served."

The Associated Press contributed to this article.

Popular wing restaurant fails health inspection … partly because of cockroaches

A local franchise restaurant very popular for its wings has failed a health inspection … partly because of cockroaches.

The American Deli on North Hairston Road in DeKalb County failed with a 63 on Tuesday.

Some customers had no idea about the failing score because the current score wasn’t posted when Channel 2 Action News went there Thursday.

Customer Laura Soto told Channel 2’s Carol Sbarge that the food is OK, and she said she didn’t know what the current score was because it wasn’t on the wall. 

The health inspector noted in the report that there was a live cockroach in the dining room. There were also dead roaches under the drink dispenser.

TRENDING STORIES:

Walton County man accused of killing wife taken into custody Security upped in Newnan ahead of planned neo-Nazi rally 2 to 4 inches of rain expected in near future

Customer Edward Smith said he doesn’t want to be drinking roach juice.

When Sbarge went to that American Deli she was told the manager wasn’t there, but Lee Changek called her.

Changek said he was brought in a month ago by the person in charge of this franchise location.

“I noticed right away there were serious problems and put into action a renovation of the restaurant. That is happening right now,” Changek said.

He also asked the DeKalb County Health Department to train all employees on food safety practices. That happened this week.

Smith said he expects much better than a 63 at a franchise restaurant and hopes they do better on the re-inspection. We’ll keep you posted on how they do.

Popular wing restaurant fails health inspection … partly because of cockroaches

A local franchise restaurant very popular for its wings has failed a health inspection … partly because of cockroaches.

The American Deli on North Hairston Road in DeKalb County failed with a 63 on Tuesday.

Some customers had no idea about the failing score because the current score wasn’t posted when Channel 2 Action News went there Thursday.

Customer Laura Soto told Channel 2’s Carol Sbarge that the food is OK, and she said she didn’t know what the current score was because it wasn’t on the wall. 

The health inspector noted in the report that there was a live cockroach in the dining room. There were also dead roaches under the drink dispenser.

TRENDING STORIES:

Walton County man accused of killing wife taken into custody Security upped in Newnan ahead of planned neo-Nazi rally 2 to 4 inches of rain expected in near future

Customer Edward Smith said he doesn’t want to be drinking roach juice.

When Sbarge went to that American Deli she was told the manager wasn’t there, but Lee Changek called her.

Changek said he was brought in a month ago by the person in charge of this franchise location.

“I noticed right away there were serious problems and put into action a renovation of the restaurant. That is happening right now,” Changek said.

He also asked the DeKalb County Health Department to train all employees on food safety practices. That happened this week.

Smith said he expects much better than a 63 at a franchise restaurant and hopes they do better on the re-inspection. We’ll keep you posted on how they do.

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