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Win em before you can buy em!

(4/24-4/27) Listen Tuesday-Friday at 6:00am for your chance to win tickets BEFORE YOU CAN BUY THEM to see Lady Antebellum with special guests Kip Moore and Russell Dickerson at Verizon Amphitheatre on September 27th.

Tickets on sale this Friday (4/27) at 10am. Presale Thursday from 10a-10p, use password GUITAR. 

Click here for tickets and more info!

Director Oliver Stone in Iran for movie festival

American movie director Oliver Stone was Iran on Monday attending an international film festival.

Stone hosted a workshop for filmmakers during the Fajr Film Festival and planned to hold a news conference on Wednesday, Iranian media reported. French actor Jean-Pierre Léaud and Italian producer Giovanni Spagnoletti are also attending the festival.

The semi-official Tasnim news agency said Stone briefly visited the historical city of Isfahan the previous day.

This is the Hollywood director's first visit to Iran.

In 2007, Iran's then-President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad rejected a proposal by Stone to make a film about him. Ahmadinejad said at the time that Stone is part the "Great Satan" cultural establishment, a reference to the United States.

In 2012, Stone's son Sean Stone visited Iran and converted to Shiite Islam.

'The Crown' star speaks about pay disparity

"The Crown" star Matt Smith says he supports fellow actor Claire Foy over the revelation that Foy was paid less than her male co-star in the Netflix drama.

A producer disclosed last month that Foy, who starred as Britain's Queen Elizabeth II, was paid less than Smith, who played Prince Philip, because Smith was better known.

Smith told The Hollywood Reporter he believes they should be paid "equally and fairly." He says he's pleased "it was resolved and they made amends." Smith did not explain what he meant.

The gender pay gap has become a big issue in Hollywood after revelations that many female stars have been paid less than their male counterparts.

Foy and Smith are being replaced by older performers in the next season of the show.

You can now go deer hunting on Brantley Gilbert’s Farm in Alabama

Brantley Gilbert is the proud owner of a deer farm in Alabama, and you can go hunting there.  It’s called Countrywide Whitetails and it features 433 acres that are “high-fenced.”

It’s legitimately like an amusement park! They sell packages that include lodging, three meals a day, transportation to and from the stand, professional guides on your hunt . . . plus game cleaning and taxidermy prep.  There’s even a fully stocked fishing pond.

We also know that Brantley Gilbert is a huge fan of the military and all who serve. We have seen that at his shows and in his music. So, of course, he made it accessible so wounded veterans can go hunting.  He even built a wheelchair friendly lodge.

Here’s very proud of that.  He says, quote, “We got to bring our first vet out.  He’s a double amputee with an amazing story [and] he killed a hundred sixty-something inch buck.  Killed a massive buck.

“I let his son shoot one too.  It was a great time.  And we’re looking forward to doing more of that.”

CULLMAN, AL – JUNE 19: Singer/songwriter Brantley Gilbert performs during The 4th. Annual Pepsi’s Rock The South Festival on June 19, 2015 Heritage Park in Cullman, Alabama. (Photo by Rick Diamond/Getty Images for Pepsi’s Rock The South)

Taylor Swift Says Her New Song With Sugarland Has Been In The Making For Years

Following the release of Sugarland’s new Taylor Swift-penned song “Babe” on Friday (4/20), Taylor took to Instagram to share details about the collaboration:

Taylor Swift says, “It’s a song that I wrote with Pat Monahan when I was making the Red album. And, I’m so happy that it gets its own life. I’m so happy that Sugarland wanted to record it and has done such a great job with it. And I’m so stoked to be able to sing on it, too.”

Swift’s post on Instagram can be seen here:

Janet Jackson is extending her State of the World Tour

Janet Jackson is extending her uber-successful tour with more shows.

The pop icon says her State of the World Tour, which originally wrapped in December, will kick off new dates July 11 in Austin, Texas. Dates have also been added in Rogers, Arkansas; Cincinnati; Syracuse, New York; Hersey, Pennsylvania; Saratoga Springs, New York; Virginia Beach, Virginia; Raleigh; Charlotte; Miami; and Tampa.

Tickets for the new dates go on sale Tuesday.

Jackson's State of the World Tour, which toured United States and Canada, was a critically acclaimed success.

The singer will also play a number of music festivals this summer, including Essence, FYF, Panorama and Outside Lands.

Prince charming: Kate gives birth to boy, home by suppertime

Third time's a charm. The Duchess of Cambridge gave birth Monday morning to a new prince who is fifth in line to the British throne — and she was home by suppertime.

The duchess and husband Prince William drove to St. Mary's Hospital in London early in the morning, and Kate's 8 pound, 7 ounce (3.8 kilogram) boy was born at 11:01 a.m., with royal officials announcing the birth about two hours later.

There followed a smoothly choreographed operation perfected after the births of the couple's two other children. In late afternoon, elder siblings Prince George and Princess Charlotte were brought to meet their baby brother. Around 6 p.m., Kate emerged alongside her husband, wearing a vibrant red dress and holding the tiny royal highness wrapped in a white lace shawl.

After posing for dozens of photographers and camera crews outside the hospital's private Lindo Wing, the trio headed home, with the baby nestled securely in a car seat. Television news helicopters followed the royal Range Rover as it made the mile-long (1.6 kilometer) journey to the family's Kensington Palace residence.

William declared the couple "very delighted" with the new addition to the family.

The royal palace said "the queen, the Duke of Edinburgh, the Prince of Wales, the Duchess of Cornwall, Prince Harry and members of both families have been informed and are delighted with the news." Prime Minister Theresa May offered "warmest congratulations."

News of the royal birth came with a mix of tradition and modernity typical of Britain's media-savvy royal family. It was announced on Twitter and also proclaimed in the forecourt of Buckingham Palace with a framed notice perched on a golden easel.

Tony Appleton, a town crier from southeast England, showed up in full regalia to declare the newborn prince's birth outside the hospital. The words "It's a boy" flashed in lights around the top of London's BT Tower, which can be seen for miles around.

More ceremonial celebration will come Tuesday, including the pealing of bells at Westminster Abbey and a gun salute in London's Hyde Park.

The baby is a younger brother to 4-year-old Prince George and Princess Charlotte, who turns 3 next week. Both were born at the same hospital, as were William and his younger brother, Prince Harry.

The infant's name, which has been subject to a flurry of bets, is likely to be announced in the next few days. Arthur and James are among bookmakers' favorites for the new prince, whose full title will be His Royal Highness, Prince (Name) of Cambridge.

"You'll find out soon enough," William said when asked about the baby's name.

Monday is St. George's Day, England's national day, but the baby is unlikely to be given the name since his older brother already has it.

The new arrival is Queen Elizabeth II's sixth great-grandchild and bumps Prince Harry to sixth place in the line of succession. The baby is fifth in line, after grandfather Prince Charles, father Prince William and his two siblings.

Charlotte is the first royal daughter to stay ahead of a younger brother in the line of succession. Before the rules were changed in 2012, male heirs took precedence.

Kensington Palace announced in September that Kate was pregnant with her third child. As in her previous pregnancies, the duchess suffered from hyperemesis gravidarum, a severe form of morning sickness.

Officials announced her previous pregnancies before the traditional 12-week mark because she was too unwell to attend public engagements. This time around, it kept her from taking George to his first day of school.

The 36-year-old duchess, formerly Kate Middleton, nevertheless kept up a busy schedule of royal duties during her pregnancy, including a visit with William to Scandinavia. She carried out her last official engagement on March 22 before going on maternity leave.

The birth was overseen by a team of doctors including consultant obstetrician Guy Thorpe-Beeston and consultant gynecologist Alan Farthing — who were also called in for the births of George and Charlotte — as well as the hospital's midwives.

Television crews, journalists and royal fans had set up camp outside the hospital for the "royal baby watch" since early April in anticipation of the arrival.

The top White House spokeswoman offered personal encouragement to William and Kate on becoming the parents of three children.

"From one mother to another, I know the reality of being outnumbered can be very scary, but I know she and Prince William will continue to be amazing parents," Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders, herself a mother of three, said during a White House briefing.

John Loughrey, a veteran royal-watcher who camped outside the hospital for two weeks, said the baby would be "very good for our country and of course, Her Majesty the queen."

"I'm so pleased it's St. George's Day," he said before the birth was announced. "St. George himself would be very pleased if the baby's born today."

Closing arguments, deliberations loom in Bill Cosby retrial

Bill Cosby's sexual assault retrial is set to go to the jury on Tuesday, but not before closing arguments pitting the prosecution's portrayal of a serial predator against the defense's contention that he's the victim of a "con artist" who made up drugging and molestation allegations to score a big payday.

The defense rested on Monday after the 80-year-old comedian said he wouldn't testify, echoing his decision at his first trial, which ended in a hung jury last year.

"You now have all of the evidence," Judge Steven O'Neill told jurors, sending them back to their sequestration hotel after an abbreviated day of testimony. "Try to relax, so that you're on your game tomorrow."

Jurors at Cosby's first trial deliberated for five days without reaching a verdict on three related counts of aggravated indecent assault. Each carries a prison sentence of up to 10 years.

That trial hinged largely on chief accuser Andrea Constand's testimony alleging that the "Cosby Show" star once known as America's Dad knocked her out with three pills and violated her at his suburban Philadelphia mansion in January 2004.

Cosby has said he gave Costand a cold and allergy medicine to help her relax before what he called a consensual sexual encounter.

The current panel of seven men and five women also heard from Constand, but both sides have given them much more to consider.

This time, prosecutors were able to call five additional accusers who testified that Cosby also drugged and violated them — including one woman who asked him through her tears, "You remember, don't you, Mr. Cosby?"

Cosby's new defense team, led by Michael Jackson lawyer Tom Mesereau, countered with a far more robust effort at stoking doubts about Constand's credibility and raising questions about whether Cosby's arrest was even legal.

The defense's star witness was a former colleague of Constand who says Constand spoke of leveling false sexual assault accusations against a high-profile person for the purpose of filing a civil suit. Constand got a civil settlement of nearly $3.4 million from Cosby.

Both juries also heard from Cosby himself, via an explosive deposition he gave in 2005 and 2006 as part of Constand's civil suit against him. In it, Cosby acknowledged he gave the sedative quaaludes to women before sex in the 1970s.

Cosby's lawyers devoted the last two days of their case to travel records they say prove he couldn't have been at his suburban Philadelphia home in January 2004. Cosby's lawyers argue that any encounter there with Constand would have happened earlier, thus falling outside the statute of limitations.

The date of the alleged encounter is important because Cosby was charged late in 2015 — just before the 12-year statute of limitations was set to expire.

But prosecutors pointed out multiple stretches of time that month when Cosby wasn't aboard his private jet or performing around the country. And District Attorney Kevin Steele noted in court Monday that the records reflect only jet travel, not other modes of transportation.

The flight records and travel itineraries produced by Cosby's lawyers do not show any flights in or out of the Philadelphia area in January 2004, indicating he wasn't around for the alleged assault, according to the defense.

But the records also have large gaps — a total of 17 days that month in which Cosby wasn't traveling, performing or taping TV appearances.

Cross-examining a defense aviation expert, Steele, the prosecutor, zeroed in on March 16, 2004, the date Constand said she confronted Cosby after a dinner he hosted at a Chinese restaurant for Philadelphia high school students.

Cosby's private jet records don't show him taking any flights to the Philadelphia area around that time, either.

"You can't tell us whether he got on a commercial flight," Steele said. "You can't tell us whether he got on a train. You can't tell us whether he got in a car and drove to Philadelphia."

Jurors also heard Monday from Roslyn Yarbrough, a former secretary for Cosby's agent, who testified that Cosby spent most of his time at his Massachusetts estate and New York City townhouse and was "very rarely" at the home near Philadelphia.

The Associated Press does not typically identify people who say they are victims of sexual assault unless they grant permission, which Constand has done.

___

Follow Mike Sisak at https://twitter.com/mikesisak .

___

For more coverage visit https://www.apnews.com/tag/CosbyonTrial .

Twain apologizes for saying she would have voted for Trump

Shania Twain has apologized for saying if she were American she would have voted for Donald Trump for president, even though he's offensive.

Twain made the comments in an interview with The Guardian that was published over the weekend. She told the British newspaper "Do you want straight or polite? . I would have voted for a feeling that is transparent."

After receiving backlash, Twain took to Twitter to explain herself.

The Canadian says she wasn't prepared for the question and was trying to express how Trump had connected with a certain segment of the U.S population.

Twain also says she's against discrimination of any kind and hopes it's clear from her public stances that she doesn't share any moral beliefs with Trump.

Cosby defense team lobs attacks in court of public opinion

Jurors weren't allowed to hear testimony that Bill Cosby's chief accuser was once hooked on hallucinogenic mushrooms or had her sights set on becoming a millionaire, but that hasn't stopped the defense from airing the explosive claims about Andrea Constand in the court of public opinion.

With Cosby's sexual assault retrial heading for deliberations this week, the 80-year-old comedian's lawyers and publicists are increasingly playing to an audience of millions, not just the 12 people deciding his fate.

They're hitting at Constand's credibility in the media with attacks that Judge Steven O'Neill is deeming too prejudicial or irrelevant for court, and they're holding daily press briefings portraying Cosby as the victim of an overzealous prosecutor and an unjust legal system.

Cosby spokesman Andrew Wyatt has decried Constand's allegations of drugging and molestation as "fantastical stories" and deemed District Attorney Kevin Steele an "extortionist" for spending taxpayer money on the case.

Lawyer Dennis McAndrews, who's been in court following the retrial, said prominent defendants like Cosby almost always play to the court of public opinion when there's no gag order, but that his team's approach hasn't been "particularly effective or convincing."

"It is so strident, and it is so hyperbolic, I think most people will turn it off," said McAndrews, who prosecuted chemical heir John E. du Pont for murder in 1997 and is not associated with either side in the Cosby case.

O'Neill is expected to rule Monday on what could be the Cosby team's last line of attack in the courtroom: whether jurors can hear deposition testimony that Cosby's lawyers say could have insights into what led Constand to accuse him.

Constand's confidante, Sheri Williams, gave the testimony as part of Constand's 2005 lawsuit against Cosby, which he wound up settling for nearly $3.4 million. Cosby's lawyers said that testimony is vital because Williams is not responding to subpoena attempts.

Cosby's lawyers are expected to call an agent and an aviation consultant to the witness stand on Monday as they continue to make the case that he never visited his suburban Philadelphia mansion in January 2004 — the month Constand says he knocked her out with pills and molested her there.

The date is important because Cosby was not charged until December 2015, just before the 12-year statute of limitations was set to expire.

Cosby's lead attorney, Tom Mesereau, opened the retrial by calling Constand a "con artist" who framed Cosby for a big payday. Her former Temple University colleague Marguerite Jackson testified that Constand once mused about setting up a high-profile person.

Mesereau raised Constand's alleged drug use on Friday in a courtroom full of reporters, but no jurors, saying bus driver Robert Russell's testimony would contradict her claims of living a healthy, holistic life. Wyatt repeated the allegations to the TV cameras outside the courthouse.

Constand's lawyer, Dolores Troiani, said in an interview that she had serious doubts about Russell's claims that Constand made extensive use of mushrooms and marijuana when they were friends in Toronto in 2001.

"This lady is a health nut," said Troiani.

In court, Mesereau argued that Russell's testimony would crack Constand's "false aura" that she's the "purest person" and undercut the prosecution's suggestion that she's "some innocent babe in the woods."

"According to her close friend for a number of years, that's nonsense," Mesereau said.

O'Neill swiftly rejected the drug testimony, saying Constand's behavior three years before the alleged assault was irrelevant.

He also prevented Russell from testifying that Constand went to the U.S. with a goal of becoming a millionaire, saying it was too broad a claim to have any relevance to the assertion that she framed Cosby for money.

Some damage was already done, Troiani said.

"It is absolutely part of their strategy to smear her reputation," Troiani said. "They know they have judicial immunity, so they can say these things whether or not there's a basis in fact."

The Associated Press does not typically identify people who say they are victims of sexual assault unless they grant permission, which Constand has done.

___

Follow Mike Sisak at https://twitter.com/mikesisak.

___

For more coverage visit https://www.apnews.com/tag/CosbyonTrial.

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