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Posted: September 09, 2016

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital


St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital is internationally recognized for its pioneering research and treatment of children with cancer and other life-threatening diseases. The hospital’s research has helped push overall survival rates for childhood cancer from less than 20 percent when the institution opened to almost 80 percent today. It is the first and only National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center devoted solely to children, and no family ever pays St. Jude for anything. For more information, visit www.stjude.org.

Quick Facts about St. Jude

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital opened on February 4, 1962 and was founded by the late entertainer Danny Thomas. Its mission is to find cures for children with cancer and other catastrophic diseases through research and treatment. 

St. Jude has treated children from all 50 states and from around the world.

On average, 7,800 active patients visit the hospital each year, most of whom are treated on an outpatient basis.

St. Jude has 78 inpatient beds and treats upwards of 260 patients each day.

St. Jude is the first and only pediatric cancer center to be designated as a Comprehensive Cancer Center by the National Cancer Institute.

St. Jude is the first institution established for the sole purpose of conducting basic and clinical research and treatment into catastrophic childhood diseases, mainly cancer.

Research findings at St. Jude are shared freely with doctors and scientists all over the world.

The medical and scientific staff published more than 680 articles in academic journals in 2010, more than any other pediatric cancer research center in the United States. St. Jude’s researchers are published and cited more often in high impact publications than any other private pediatric oncology institution in America.

No family ever pays St. Jude for anything.

Parents magazine named St. Jude as one of the top children's cancer care hospitals in the U.S. for two consecutive surveys.

St. Jude has developed protocols that have helped push overall survival rates for childhood cancers from less than 20 percent when the hospital opened in 1962 to 80 percent today.

In 1962, the survival rate for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common form of childhood cancer, was 4 percent. Today, the survival rate for this once deadly disease is 94 percent, thanks to research and treatment protocols developed at St. Jude.

The daily operating cost for St. Jude is $1.8 million, which is primarily covered by public contributions.

During the past five years, 81 cents of every dollar received has supported the research and treatment at St. Jude.

St. Jude recently completed an extensive expansion program that bolstered the hospital’s research and treatment efforts, while more than doubling the size of its original campus. The campus now has 2.5 million square feet of research, clinical and administrative space dedicated to finding cures and saving children. The expansion included the Children’s GMP, LLC, currently the nation’s only pediatric research center on-site facility for the research and production of highly specialized treatments and vaccines; an expanded Department of Immunology; and a new Department of Chemical Biology and Therapeutics for discovery of new drugs.

The Chili’s Care Center, opened in November 2007, integrates patient care and research where rapidly evolving CT (computerized tomography) and MR (magnetic resonance) technologies keep St. Jude at the cutting edge for radiation therapy in a pediatric/adolescent setting. Additionally, a state-of-the-art cyclotron enables St. Jude researchers to undertake many important new PET (positron emission tomography) studies. These imaging techniques facilitate the rapid evaluation of new therapeutic approaches and help choose those most likely to be successful.

St. Jude pioneered a combination of chemotherapy, radiation and surgery to treat childhood cancers.

Peter C. Doherty, PhD, of St. Jude Immunology, won the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1996. He shares the award with Rolf M. Zinkernagel, MD, of the University of Zurich. Their findings have led to breakthroughs in the understanding and treatment of viral infections and cancers, and in the development of organ transplant procedures and vaccines.

St. Jude patients are referred by a physician, and generally have a disease currently under study and are eligible for a current research protocol on clinical research trials.

St. Jude researchers and doctors are treating children with pediatric AIDS, as well as using new drugs and therapies to fight infections.

St. Jude was the first institution to develop a cure for sickle cell disease with a bone marrow transplant and has one of the largest pediatric sickle cell programs in the country.

St. Jude is a World Health Organization Collaborating Center for Studies on the Ecology of Influenza Viruses in Animals and Birds.

St. Jude was the first facility outside the National Institutes of Health to receive federal approval for research involving human gene therapy.

The St. Jude faculty includes three National Academy of Sciences members: Peter C. Doherty, PhD, of Immunology; Charles Sherr, MD, PhD, of Tumor Cell Biology; and Robert Webster, PhD, of Infectious Diseases. Sherr and Brenda Schulman, PhD, Structural Biology, hold the coveted title of Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigators.

The St. Jude faculty also includes five members of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences: William E. Evans, St. Jude director and chief executive officer; Arthur Nienhuis, MD, of Hematology and former director and CEO; Charles Sherr, MD, PhD, of Tumor Cell Biology; Nobel Laureate Peter Doherty, PhD, of Immunology; and Mary Relling, PharmD, Pharmaceutical Sciences chair.

St. Jude is the national coordinating center for the National Cancer Institute-funded Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium. St. Jude is the coordinating center for the nationwide Children’s Cancer Survivor Study, funded by the National Cancer Institute. St. Jude is the national coordinating center for the National Cancer Institute-sponsored Pediatric Drug Discovery Consortium. St. Jude is the coordinating center for a national study of sickle cell disease treatment funded by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute of the National Cancer Institute.


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            Judge orders Ryan Lochte, James Feigen to stay in Brazil as robbery investigation continues

Matt Hazlett

Judge orders Ryan Lochte, James Feigen to stay in Brazil as robbery investigation continues

A Brazilian judge has ordered two American Olympic athletes to surrender their passports as authorities investigate a claim that they were robbed at gunpoint by people posing as police officers during the Rio Olympic Games.

>> UPDATE: Brazil pulls 2 of Ryan Lochte's teammates off plane amid robbery probe

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The office of Judge Keylan Blank confirmed to The Associated Press that swimmers Ryan Lochte and James Feigen were to have their passports seized. However, Lochte's father told the wire service his son had returned to the United States before the order was issued.

It was not clear if Feigen remained in the country.

Patrick Sandusky, chief external affairs officer for the U.S. Olympic Committee, said officers asked to meet with the swimmers Wednesday morning to get their passports.

>> For complete Olympic coverage, click here

“The swim team moved out of the (Olympic) Village after their competition ended, so we were not able to make the athletes available,” Sandisky said. “Additionally, as part of our standard security protocol, we do not make athlete travel plans public and therefore cannot confirm the athletes’ current location. We will continue to cooperate with Brazilian authorities.”

Four members of the U.S. Olympics Swimming Team – Gunnar Bentz, Jack Conger, Feigen and Lochte – said they were robbed Sunday as they took a taxi from France House to the Olympic Village, the Olympic Committee said.

>> Related: Ryan Lochte among swimmers robbed at gunpoint by men posing as police

“Their taxi was stopped by individuals posing as armed police officers who demanded the athletes' money and other personal belongings,” the Committee said in a statement. “All four athletes are safe and cooperating with authorities.”

A police official told The Associated Press authorities have not been able to verify that the robbery took place. Speaking on the condition of anonymity because of the ongoing investigation, the officials said police have been unable to find witnesses or the swimmers' taxi driver.

Gator surprises beachgoers after washing ashore on Myrtle Beach

Folks walking along the beach in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, found a companion out enjoying the sun and surf: a 4-foot alligator.

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Sharon Martin told The Sun News that she and a friend were taking their daily walk along the beach on Monday evening when the gator came walking out of the ocean.

They called 911 and emergency crews were dispatched. But after a short time lounging on the beach, the alligator headed back to the surf on its own.

The animal was spotted later in the evening and was eventually captured and released into a safe place.

No one was injured, but Martin said she had never seen anything like it and that it was pretty frightening to see an alligator coming out of the surf.

 

Thousands of Olympic volunteers are quitting

Athletes being robbed, pools turning green -- the 2016 Olympic Games certainly haven't been a walk in the park.

But now, Olympic officials are dealing with another issue: a shortage of volunteers.

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Before the games kicked off, officials selected 50,000 volunteers to do everything from directing fans to venues to driving Olympic officials around.

But a spokesperson for the Rio 2016 organizing committee told the The Wall Street Journal that at some places, only 1 out of every 5 volunteers showed up to help out.

An Olympic official told another outlet the average overall volunteer attendance is close to 70 percent.

Even though organizers have a volunteer waiting list, it doesn't appear that's helping.

So why aren't volunteers showing up?

Some say they quit because they were overworked, underappreciated and barely fed.

One volunteer, who travels two hours every morning to get to her post, said she's overworked.

She told CBC, "They ask us to come to work really early and then hold us back when it's time to go home."

Another volunteer who recently quit told the outlet volunteers only got one small snack for their entire shift. He said, "I don't think the organizing committee had enough consideration for people's lives and welfare."

According to Newsy, some volunteers are still waiting for their assignments. The games end Aug. 21.


            What time is Usain Bolt running tonight?

Associated Press

What time is Usain Bolt running tonight?

Jamaica’s Usain Bolt will compete tonight in the 200-meter semifinal in the 2016 Olympics.

Bolt, who says the race is his favorite, is set to run around 9:06 p.m. He won the Men’s 100-meter sprint on Sunday, beating American Justin Gatlin.

The United States has won 84 medals as of Wednesday morning  -  28 Golds; 28 Silver and 28 Bronze.

Here's more on Usain Bolt:

> Usain Bolt has never run a full mile

> Ellen DeGeneres faces backlash for 'racist' Usain Bolt tweet